Blog

Fresh perspectives on art, life, and current events. From deep dives to quick takes to insightful interviews, it’s the museum in conversation. Beyond the walls. Outside the frame. Around the world.

Read the Full Article

“Egypt’s Sunken Cities” and the mystery of the missing phallus

Even by the standards of myth, Osiris’ penis went through some epic travails. One day it was there, along with the rest of Osiris’ godly self, as he ruled over Egypt. The next it was gone, as Osiris was murdered by his brother and literally dismembered—chopped into 14 pieces and scattered across the country. His 

Keep Reading
Read the Full Article

Introducing “Inspired by Mia,” a site for artwork influenced by Mia’s collection

By Katie Sisneros, a content analyst and Mellon/ACLS Public Fellow at Mia When you think of an art museum, what sort of actions spring to mind? Walking, for sure. Lots of walking happens in art museums. Looking, thinking, feeling, laughing, crying…all of these are very personal actions we perform when we inhabit an art museum’s 

Keep Reading
Read the Full Article

What we learned on a visit to Native American women artists

By Juline Chevalier, head of Interpretation and Participatory Experiences at Mia One thing I love about working for a museum is having a lot of variety in the tasks and projects I work on. No two days are ever the same: There are always new exhibitions, new visitors, and new volunteers to engage. Don’t get 

Keep Reading
Read the Full Article

13 great holiday gift ideas from the Store at Mia

Most of us don’t think about holiday gifts until the day—or the hour—that we allot to buy them. So we went looking for ideas from the staff at the Store at Mia, who have had plenty of time to think about it and check things out—and are often customers themselves. Here’s what they would pick 

Keep Reading
Read the Full Article

Why are we so fascinated by ancient Egypt?

Most Americans couldn’t name the current president of Egypt and many would be hard-pressed to name anything that’s happened in Egypt in the last 30 years—or maybe 3,000 years. (It’s Abdel Fatah el-Sisi, and plenty has happened.) But they know about mummies and pyramids and King Tut, and probably even hieroglyphs—an obsolete form of writing from 

Keep Reading
Read the Full Article

New frame of mind: Monet’s grainstack gets a fresh look in a new frame

What do you notice when you look at a painting? Perhaps the composition strikes you first—the shapes, the colors, the lines. You might notice the depth created by thick or thin brush strokes. Then your field of vision zooms out and you notice the painting’s frame. Is it simple and unadorned, drawing attention not to 

Keep Reading
Read the Full Article

Spirited away: The incredible ghosts of Yoshitoshi

Owariya Yonejiro was born in 1839 in old Edo, now Tokyo, into a way of life on its way out. His father, a wealthy merchant, had essentially purchased samurai status, becoming part of the ruling class in its waning decades of power. At 11, he was apprenticed to one of the last great masters of 

Keep Reading
Read the Full Article

Five takeaways from Roman Krznaric’s talk at Mia on empathy and art

Since publishing his “Six Habits of Highly Empathetic People” in 2012, and elaborating on them soon after in Empathy: Why it Matters and How to Get It, Roman Krznaric has become a kind of empathy whisperer. The social philosopher, a founding faculty member of The School of Life in London, has been an empathy advisor 

Keep Reading
Read the Full Article

How MASS Action could transform museums like Mia

This week, Mia hosts a convening of museums. Some will come from across the river, others from across the ocean. It will be the third meeting of an initiative called MASS Action (Museums as Site for Social Action), a movement that intends to reshape the model of what a 21st-century museum can be. But what 

Keep Reading
Read the Full Article

Why the Print and Drawing Fair, at 25, is still a draw

The first official Minneapolis Print & Drawing Fair was held at Mia in 1993, when Bill Clinton was president, the Internet was largely limited to college campuses, and, more to the point, there were no Twin Cities galleries dedicated to selling art prints. Much has changed—except for the last point. The only place in Minnesota 

Keep Reading